Content of a Cover Letter

Here are some closing statements of a cover letter that you can use if you’re having difficulty coming up with your own.  There are things you need to include in every cover letter, regardless of what other career guides you read or career counselor you follow.

KEY ELEMENTS
I. Add at least 1 sentence that indicates excitement.
II. Must have a Call-to-Action.

I.  SHOW KEEN INTEREST/ENTHUSIASM IN THE POSITION AND/OR COMPANY

EXAMPLE #1 OF KEEN INTEREST/ENTHUSIASM

“If I am offered this position, I will be ready to hit the ground running and help XYZ Company exceed its own expectations for success.” By adding this piece to your conclusion, you will be able to add some flare and excitement to your cover letter. The reader will become intrigued by your enthusiasm to “hit the ground running.” Employers look for candidates who are prepared for the position and are easy to train. Therefore, this phrase will definitely raise some curiosity and the reader will want to discover what you have to offer for their company.

That comes from Glassdoor.  

EXAMPLE #2 OF KEEN INTEREST/ENTHUSIASM

“In my career, I’ve consistently leveraged data while managing past marketing campaigns—including reviewing performance and making adjustments to improve email open rates by as much as 200%. I would love to apply what I’ve learned in this new role at Company ABC.”  Just make sure that you are uber specific. 

That comes from Indeed.

II.  A CALL-TO-ACTION

MUST HAVE A CALL TO ACTION!!!
MUST HAVE A CALL TO ACTION!!!
MUST HAVE A CALL TO ACTION!!!

“I will call you next Tuesday to follow up on my application and arrange for an interview.” The most essential part of your closing is your “call to action” statement. Remember, the purpose of your cover letter is to land an interview. Don’t end your cover letter saying you’ll hope to get in touch. Explain to the reader the exact day and how you will be contacting them. When you state you will be following up with the employer, make sure you do it!

THESE ARE BAD.  THEY’RE REALLY, REALLY BAD [DO NOT FOLLOW THIS EXAMPLE.  UGH!!!]
These suggestions are really, really bad.  Maybe even worse than what you might learn in a high-school career or writing class.  Gawd, they’re bad.  I am surprised that they even made the internet.

STRUCTURE YOUR COVER LETTER JUST SO
I took an AWAI course on Resume-Writing and part of that course included how to write cover letters.  One suggestion they made was to highlight 3 examples of your accomplishments, the same ones you included in your resume, smack dab in the middle of your cover letter so that it mirrors or evokes what was covered in your resume.  That’s one suggestion on how to structure that one detail of your letter.  

MORE GOOD TIPS
from Indeed